The White Witch of Rose Hall

Rose Hall mansion is located about 20 minutes from Montego Bay

Images by Joyce Meyer, Rose Hall information from Wikepedia.

Rose Hall is widely regarded to be a visually impressive house and the most famous of the Great Houses in Jamaica. It is a Georgian mansion with a stone base and a plastered upper story, high on the hillside, with a panorama view over the coast. Built in the 1770s, Rose Hall was restored in the 1960s to its former splendor, with mahogany floors, interior windows and doorways, paneling and wooden ceilings. It is decorated with silk wallpaper printed with palms and birds, ornamented with chandeliers and furnished with mostly European antiques.  Presently, Rose Hall is a museum for tourists who wish to see where Annie Palmer ate, slept and also areas of the house where she is said to haunt. Possible areas where the murders took place, e.g. in her bedroom where she suffocated one of her lovers with a pillow. Rose Hall is also known for holding seances to try and conjure her spirit and gain answers about the mysterious deaths of her husbands and fanciful legends of underground tunnels, bloodstains and hauntings that surround it.

Do you see any paranormal objects in any of these images?  Hmmm…

Below is an image of one of the ornate silk wallpaper patterns.

The story states that the White Witch was Annie Palmer, who was born in England to an English mother and Irish father. She spent most of her life, however, in Haiti. After her parents died of yellow fever she was adopted by her nanny who regularly practiced voodoo. This is where Annie learned witchcraft. She later moved to Jamaica, where she was married to John Palmer in 1820. As an adult, she reportedly stood 4’11”.

John was the owner of Rose Hall Plantation, east of Montego Bay. Annie’s husband (and two subsequent husbands as well) died suspiciously, and it is speculated that Annie herself brought about their demise. Annie became known as a mistress of voodoo, using it to terrorize the plantation, and taking male slaves into her bed at night and often murdering them.

Do you see any paranormal images in the mirror?

She is also supposed to have dispatched her lovers allegedly because she was bored of them. The legend has her being murdered in her bed during the slave uprisings of the 1830s by one of her slave lovers. The slave in particular was named Takoo, who also practiced voodoo and became one of Annie’s lovers based on their connection. Annie was killed by Takoo because she was in love with the husband of Takoo’s granddaughter. When Annie found she could not have him, she conjured a voodoo curse on Takoo’s granddaughter who died a week later. When Takoo found this out, he killed Annie. Takoo ran into the forest to hide after murdering Annie, but was quickly caught by an overseer (another of Annie’s lovers) and killed.

It was said that a family who owned the property after the Palmers had a housekeeper who was “pushed” by Annie off of Annie’s favorite balcony, subsequently breaking her neck and dying.

Our tour guide was very entertaining and added “spooky” elements to her presentation to keep us on edge.  She deserved the round of applause we gave her.  .

A quick group photo before we left Rose Hall.  I guess I didn’t get the “head tilt” memo…  No, wait!  That’s a genetic issue with female members of the Meyer family.

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5 thoughts on “The White Witch of Rose Hall

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