The Search for Hungry Hills Farm

September 9, 2015:

Our ancestry includes proud Scottish roots through our mother whose maiden name was Sharp. The mission of this portion of our trip to Scotland was locating the farm of our ancestors.

Longmanhill, Scotland is located some three miles east of the city of Banff-McDuff in Gamrie Parish on the north coast of Scotland. From the top of Longmanhill, on a clear day, one can see out over the North Sea. This long, gently sloping hill consists of a few farms, one of which is Hungry Hills Farm. In all likelihood, this area is the ancestral home of the Sharp family dating back to the 1600’s and 1700’s. ~ Sharp Family History AddendumOctober 2001

Thanks to our determined taxi driver from Banff, our mission was accomplished!

Why did our ancestors leave such a beautiful land? Was it due to the Scottish Clearances?

Whether it was economic necessity as described by some, or ethnic cleansing, as described by others, the net result was that between 1783 and 1881 a documented 170,571 Highlanders were ejected from their traditional lands. Records are very sparse and it’s been estimated that the true total was very much greater than this. ~ tartans authority.com

These Scottish people were cleared from their homes mainly to make way for sheep, the wisdom at the time being that the sheep were more profitable than small tenant farmers. While some Highlanders left their homes
voluntarily and went abroad, most of the evictions were forced upon an unwilling population and were often carried out using the most despicable of methods. ~ yourscottishdescent.com

If anyone has an interesting link or information pertaining to this topic, please include these into the comments section of this post.  Thanks!

 

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Cullen, Scotland from my view…

An attempt to locate the land of our ancestors has led us to a stay in the quaint town of Cullen, Scotland, which is composed of two distinct parts:Cullen-1110084e1) Sandwiched between the sea wall on one side and the curve of the main road on the other is the fishing village, Seatown of Cullen, a unique collection of a couple hundred stone fishermen’s cottages.

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2) The “inland” side of Cullen, sometimes referred to as “New Cullen,” stretches up a grand and impressive main street that continues from Seatown under the most easterly of the three railway viaducts.

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I’m glad the window washer has another man holding his ladder sturdy as it appears to be propped on an old stone wall. I might be inclined to own a window washing device like this, but I’d probably hit the power line and electrocute myself. Clean windows are not worth all that!

Cullen was established by 1189 on a location about half a mile inland from where you find it today, marked on maps as “Old Cullen” and close to Cullen House, which we were able to locate while following one of the walking trails near town.

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Oh-oh… whoops! (At least we didn’t pick any flowers and don’t have a dog.)

Cullen’s wealth in the 1700s was built on textiles, and thread-making; the main period of growth came with the herring boom in the 1800s.

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The impressive Cullen railroad viaduct was built in the year 1884 and is now a bicycle path.

Cullen-1110086eNew Cullen and Seatown of Cullen were built in the 1820s, the latter close to the pier built by Thomas Telford in 1819.  ~Undiscovered Scotland

Below is a slide show of our walks around Cullen, Scotland where you’ll find the most beautiful sunsets.

…still more to explore in Cullen, Scotland so stay tuned!