Almost there, but not there… Melide

Today is going to be the longest day of the trip as we cover about 30 miles or close to 50 kilometers.
Portomarin-to-Palas-de-Rei-Elevation-MapPortomarine is a couple of kilometers to the left of the map above.

Palas-de-Rei-to-Arzua-Elevation-Map Randy, Bryon and Liz start walking and their destination is Melide which requires walking the full distance of the top map and half-way into the next stage.   Will the feet survive?

2014Camino-3 Adios,  Italia!!! 

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2014Camino-1070620nrFoggy day in the woods.

2014Camino-1070625crOccasionally a cement picnic table will appear to facilitate a quick break.

2014Camino-1070627dmvThe path is worn down from centuries of pilgrims walking to Santiago.

2014Camino-1070632dmvcrWhy can’t we stay here?   In March of 2013 we did stay here and woke up to fresh snowfall.

Have Joan and Joyce been kidnapped?  Where could they be?  Um-m-m-m… shopping?

2014Camino-But first we go to the Church of San Juan since it is Sunday. This church was reconstructed brick by brick when the dam flooded the town to build a hydroelectric power plant and they were forced to relocate the city of Portomarine.

We say a little prayer for the other three trudging down the 30 mile path today.
IMG_20140824_042957_700dmvNow we hop into a cozy taxi for a joyride to Melide where we check our group into the albergue.   Every Sunday in Melide you will find a fruit, meat and cheese market where farmers bring their produce in to sell. Randy took my camera so I’m stuck with a low-end cell phone camera and Joan’s Ipod to document the day.

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IMG_20140824_043511_793dmvcrPigs feet?  Not sure how I’d cook them so I’ll pass this time.

IMG_20140824_043540_275dmvcrThis little piggy went to market…

IMG_20140824_043601_120dmvcrNorwegian cod caught in Spanish waters. Is this like lutefisk?

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IMG_20140824_043740_452dmvcrThe air is filled with noisy chatter.

IMG_20140824_060430_499dmvcrJoan negotiates our transaction and we will be supplied with delicious cheese straight from the farmer for the next several days.  Delish!

IMG_20140824_060507_631dmvJoan and I have the great plan to walk back on the trail to meet the rest of the gang to show support.  We walk and walk, but don’t see pilgrims.  This can’t be right?  We go back, find the right road out-of-town, and wait for them…and wait…and wait… and wait some more.

Finally, after almost every pilgrim has gone by, we finally make radio contact and walk to meet them. The last 10 miles have been brutal and Randy, Bryon and Liz finally limp into town, too tired to take pictures.

Painful feet, blisters and exhaustion dictate the mood tonight.

How about some cheese with that wine?

 

 

 

 

 

 

A traveler without observation is a bird without wings. ~ Moslih Eddin

There is more to Minnesota than just the Mall of America and more to South Dakota than just Mount Rushmore.  Likewise, there’s more to Jamaica than just white sand and coastal resorts.

To each their own and there are benefits to both.

Holiday life in Jamaica:
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Real life in Jamaica:2014Jamaica-1060125

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2014Jamaica-1060133kpcrMy ultimate achievement:  Finding clotheslines to photograph in Jamaica

The Pushcart ~ Sport & Commerce

What is a push cart? Pushcarts are those homemade carts that can be seen all across Jamaica. They are used as a moving restaurant (vendors who sell food etc), to transport items (mainly merchandise to the market, but some are used as moving trucks) or as a racing cart (similar to North America soap box) in push cart derbys held across the island. Push-carting began as a grassroots sport and has become a very popular event.

The Kaiser’s Sports Club is the venue for the finals of the annual Push Cart Derby in August. Many of the owners of these homemade carts compete for cash prizes and trophies. Some of these carts are very sophisticated and have been clocked at 60 miles per hour on a downhill homestretch.

The pushcart derby in Jamaica is credited for the inspiration to start a Jamaican Bobsleigh team. Two American businessmen who attended the Jamaican Push Cart Derby were so impressed by the skills of the participants that it inspired them to negotiate the formation of a Jamaican Bobsleigh team with the Jamaican government and the prospective participants.  ~ Jamaicans.com

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Liz-Sanity at Grandma’s Marathon!!

Enjoyed the festivities at Grandma’s Marathon this past weekend as our daughter, Elizabeth, ran the 26.2 mile run along the scenic North Shore Drive from Two Harbors, MN to Canal Park in Duluth, Minnesota.  The Canal Park finish line was right next to the largest body of fresh water in the world, Lake Superior.  The community of Duluth did a wonderful job of welcoming runners and spectators while creating a fun, festive atmosphere for all.

I should have found a banner without traffic signs on it… Oh, well.  It is what it is.  Just make sure you DON’T park here from 3 – 6 a.m. and put money in the meter when you do park!

Waves of runners as viewed through the window of the skywalk.

I would enjoy participating in a community band.  Anyone need a rusty trombone player?!

We almost missed seeing her go past us.  A computer chip was put in her shoe so we were following her progress online. She had picked up speed when she got into town due to the crowds of spectators cheering runners on (She always did enjoy performance arts – bring it on…) so she got to our spot sooner than anticipated. Not wanting to miss a photo opportunity, I ran out onto the street to “catch the moment.”  Security did not tackle me since I had a baby carrier on my back!

Liz can now check “running a full marathon” off of her list of life accomplishments. Way to go!!  What’s next?

As for me, running is on my “use to could” list since I ran Grandma’s in the 1980’s but now I think my body isn’t probably as resilient as my younger self.  However, I was inspired by the number of people in my age group and older that were still running marathons. A guy in our hotel has run 33 marathons in 18 states and I think he was around my age if not older (unless marathon running really ages a person and he was 35!)  That is quite an accomplishment so I’ll allow him bragging rights.  The man who can top all for bragging rights is the 86 year old man that finished it in 6 hours something.  Now that is an accomplishment.  No, he wasn’t in a wheelchair.

Well, I’d better go… I think I’ll do a quick run to the end of the driveway.  (Hey, I have to start somewhere!!)

It’s Photo Friday!! Photo Etiquette 101

Looking for tips to stay within photography etiquette guidelines when traveling.  I love exploring cultures with my camera, including my own rural environment, but don’t want to be offensive at the same time.  Often times I find that we are “same but different” in many aspects and appreciate the uniqueness of experiences.  I have found that purchasing or tipping generously will often provide plenty of photo opportunities, but my experience with a variety of cultures is limited.

I’m reaching out to others in the world that have travel photography experience to offer suggestions to best document the experiences but be within the realm of common courtesy.  Which cultures are particularly difficult or easygoing to document?

The Peanut Man

At first we thought it was a small tar patching machine since it was parked in the road even though traffic was heavy and slow moving. We soon found out he was roasting peanuts in the machine and selling them.  It was actually a good spot for sales – wouldn’t we all like to munch on warm, roasted peanuts while waiting in traffic.

A small sack of peanuts was $1 so we purchased and they were delicious.  Plus, our new friend the peanut guy, was happy to pose for a photo after we made our transaction.

I think I could be a peanut vendor and socialize with the people while cooking delicious treats.  I don’t think peanuts would sell as well in Minnesota or South Dakota.  Beef jerky or soy nuts, maybe?  Hmmm…maybe not.

Montego Bay is more than just beaches.

Downtown area of Montego Bay on a Sunday afternoon.  Church was just getting out so  many of the adults and children were  “dressed to the nines” with their Sunday finest.

 Not a tourist area but still filled with street vendors selling items out of boxes, crates and suitcases.  Whatever works.

Fountain in the main city center, Sam Sharp Square.  Sam Sharp is a national hero, hanged for his rebellious activities.  My mother’s maiden name is “Sharp” so maybe that is where we can lay blame for the rebellious traits that occasionally  show up in our family.