It’s Photo Friday… travel cameras?

Jamaica is well known for its beautiful beaches with many tourists photographing beautiful sunsets along with frolicking in the surf and white sand pics. I observed a pair of teenage girls spending at least 3 hours posing and taking pictures with their phone of themselves in their little bikinis as though they were Sports Illustrated swimsuit models. On a morning walk along the shore I looked to the left and discovered that I had found a nude beach of primarily senior citizens. Hmmm… I decided that was NOT a photographic opportunity, but it certainly was an eye opening experience! Oh, to be so comfortable in your own skin.
I was trying out a used (but new to me) point and shoot camera, but was disappointed in the features not available (like RAW only in low ISO’s, focus was so-o-o-o frustratingly slow, settings were buried so deep into the menu and slow to access). We have been searching and analyzing on the internet and comparing models vs. price.
My question is: What is the best, yet small travel camera for photographers who like to manually control settings and have fast, spot focus? Any thoughts out there???

SAMSUNG DIGITAL CAMERA

Planning a trip to Jamaica? Let me introduce you to Solomon…

Meet Solomon Hutchinson, our tour guide/driver extraordinaire.  He was our “go to guy” for exploring locations in and around Montego Bay, Jamaica that were too far for walking.  His friendly, prompt and courteous service made our trip stress free and comfortable. He was able to provide rides for our group even though we weren’t sure of the numbers until the last minute.  He must have had some kind of magic hat to pull all this off!

My favorite quote from our Jamaican experience is from Solomon himself:

“I have no problems; only situations.”  ~ Solomon Hutchinson 

I try to remember this saying when I think I should be all stressed out about something.  You just deal with it.  End of story.

Solomon Hutchinson

Solomon Hutchinson

solomonhutchinson@hotmail.com  |  876-368-7820 |

For the most historic and cultural sightseeing and tours such as Mayfield Falls, Green Grotto Cave, Dunn River Falls, Black River Safari, Negril, 7 Miles Beach.  Wheelchair accessible.

Use only special taxis or vans operated by JUTA, the Jamaica Union of  Travellers Association (tel. 876/957-4620), or taxis operated by its  government-sanctioned counterpart, JCAL Tours (Jamaica Co-operative Automobile & Limousine Tours; tel. 876/957-4620). Do not get into a  “pirate taxi,” even if the driver promises to cut the going rate in half;  cheating tourists is disturbingly common. JUTA tariffs are controlled, and  you’ll recognize its vehicles by the union emblems and red license plates. A  list of official tariffs is posted at the airport — but it’s still important to  agree on the price before setting out, to avoid potential disagreements later.

Read more: http://www.frommers.com/destinations/montegobay/0314010002.html#ixzz2HUxZwdhq

It’s Photo Friday!! Photo Etiquette 101

Looking for tips to stay within photography etiquette guidelines when traveling.  I love exploring cultures with my camera, including my own rural environment, but don’t want to be offensive at the same time.  Often times I find that we are “same but different” in many aspects and appreciate the uniqueness of experiences.  I have found that purchasing or tipping generously will often provide plenty of photo opportunities, but my experience with a variety of cultures is limited.

I’m reaching out to others in the world that have travel photography experience to offer suggestions to best document the experiences but be within the realm of common courtesy.  Which cultures are particularly difficult or easygoing to document?

The Peanut Man

At first we thought it was a small tar patching machine since it was parked in the road even though traffic was heavy and slow moving. We soon found out he was roasting peanuts in the machine and selling them.  It was actually a good spot for sales – wouldn’t we all like to munch on warm, roasted peanuts while waiting in traffic.

A small sack of peanuts was $1 so we purchased and they were delicious.  Plus, our new friend the peanut guy, was happy to pose for a photo after we made our transaction.

I think I could be a peanut vendor and socialize with the people while cooking delicious treats.  I don’t think peanuts would sell as well in Minnesota or South Dakota.  Beef jerky or soy nuts, maybe?  Hmmm…maybe not.